Archive for July, 2012

Microsoft´s visionary Bill Gates and pioneering Norwegian Game Based Learning developer, “We Want To Know”, are working in close collaboration with the Center for Game Science at the University of Washington to test and develop Maths Games that enable kids to learn complex equations and fractions while they are having fun.

The Gates Foundation pledged $20 million in a variety of teacher tools, including Game Based Learning and other technologies geared toward changing the way teachers teach and kids learn.

We Want To Know´s revolutionary new game, DragonBox, replaces the numbers, letters and signs in Algebra with more child-friendly symbols such as funky dragons, cool animals and other engaging characters.  Using the medium of a fun game, contemporary designed animation and the touchscreen technology of a smartphone or tablet computer, Kids quickly learn how symbols can be moved and combined on both sides of a split screen divide that represents the equal sign in an equation.

We Want To Know´s Founder, Jean-Baptiste Huyhn, himself a Maths Teacher, explained, “By hiding x, y and other algebraic symbols under a layer of animated gameplay, the software is capable of introducing Kids from as young as 8 years of age to the world of Algebra, gradually revealing its underlying mathematical logic to them. I like to think DragonBox puts the “Fun” into the Fundamental Mathematics.”

Last week at the Education Commission of the States’ national forum in Atlanta, Bill Gates said, “Imagine if kids poured their time and passion into a video game that taught them math concepts while they barely noticed, because it was so enjoyable.”   This is exactly what DragonBox does so quickly and effectively.  Mr Gates, aware of would be detractors, added, “We’re not saying the whole curriculum turns into this big game. We’re saying it’s an adjunct to a serious curriculum.”

Independent research already published in Norway showed that, after one hour of playing DragonBox, 30% of the tested 12 year olds were able to tackle equations that hitherto they were unable to understand. Following two hours of playing, an astonishing 80% were then able to solve complex equations that even their parents might have struggled with.

The Gates Foundation will play a role in researching this new technology, with the Centre of Game Science announcing that DragonBox will be tested across 100 schools in the US with a view to testing and developing We Want To Know´s future Maths Games.

Dragonbox was launched last week in the US and the UK and is available to download at the Apple Mac Store and Google Games.

For further information contact: Ian McMonagle, Head of Media Relations – Ianmac@wewanttoknow.com – Tel: 004791009703 – www.wewanttoknow.com

Advertisements

WeWantToKnow to partner with The Center for Game Science at the

University of Washington – Revolutionary math game DragonBox to be tested in over 100 schools Image

Seattle/Oslo, July 10th, 2012 — French-Norwegian game-based learning company WeWantToKnow has signed an agreement with the Center for Game Science at the University of Washington to establish a strong partnership to test and develop more revolutionary math games in addition to the recently launched DragonBox.

Image

“We are very excited to have signed an agreement with one of the leading game and science centers in the US to help us test our products across over 100 schools in the US educational market,” says Jean-Baptiste Huynh, CEO and co-founder for WeWantToKnow. “Our first math game, DragonBox, has received incredible reviews, and we see from our tests in Norway that between 60-80% of the kids that play the game for two hours are then able to solve mathematical equations. We believe that with the support from the Center for Game Science, we will be able to increase this result to close to 100%.”

“I was truly impressed with DragonBox from the minute I first tested it,” says Zoran Popović, Director of the Center for Game Science. “This game focuses on one of the core concepts in Algebra, presenting it in a clever way that is accessible to children and very likely to be transferable to real math problems. We look forward to working with WeWantToKnow on the student-adaptive version of this game and deploying it in school trials across the US. I believe that as early as next year, we can have second-graders mastering key algebra concepts with just a few hours of gameplay. The Center for Game Science has been focusing on fractions and other early math bottlenecks in K-12 education, and our partnership with WeWantToKnow is the perfect next step in developing a game-based mathematics curriculum suitable for every child.”

Game-based learning is set to be become an essential part of education in the 21st century. Immediate feedback, differentiated learning paths, and active involvement through experiential and discovery learning are just some of the vital benefits that game-based learning can provide.

DragonBox is one of the first games to communicate powerful mathematical concepts through the use of mathematics in gameplay. It leads that innovation by presenting mathematics with contemporary visual design and a finely tuned user experience that has proven positive consequences on how fast and from what age students can learn difficult subjects.

Image

With WeWanToKnow´s revolutionary approach concepts that once required months or years to master are now easily attainable by young children in just a few hours.

Contact:
Ian McMonagle, Head of Media Relations, WeWantToKnow, mobil +4791009703, email:  Ianmac@wewanttoknow.com
Zoran Popović, Center for Game Science, University of Washington, 206 543 4226, email:zoran@cs.washington.edu
Jean-Baptiste Huynh, Co-Founder WeWantToKnow, mobil +4791632296, email: jb@wewanttoknow.com
Rolf Assev, Co-Founder WeWantToKnow, mobil +4792822422, email: rolf@wewanttoknow.com


What is DragonBox?

DragonBox does away with tedious equations and math quizzes, replacing them instead with a simple game involving cards and a magical box. The game evolves as kids master the skills and concepts presented. After one hour of playing DragonBox, twelve-year olds can tackle equations their parents struggle to solve. DragonBox was pre-launched in Norway to let schools, kids and parents test the game. Almost immediately, it rocketed to the top of the charts, becoming the most purchased app in the Apple App Store in Norway– displacing other, more traditional games. More than 10% of all iPad users in Norway have downloaded DragonBox within the first few weeks of its release.

DragonBox is designed for iPad and Android tablets, but also works well on iPhone and Android phones. A special version is available for Mac OS. DragonBox costs $5.99 for the tablet version and $2.99 for the phone version. Download it from the Apple App Store or Google Play.

About WeWantToKnow

WeWantToKnow is a French-Norwegian company that focuses on game-based learning. Its first product is the math game “DragonBox” and it has more games in the planning stages. The company was founded by financial analyst turned math teacher Jean-Baptiste Huyhn, the leading French game developer Patrick Marchal, and former Opera Software executives Rolf Assev and Christen Krogh. WeWantToKnow aims to make learning fun, easy and addictive. Learn more about the company on the web at http://www.wewanttoknow.com/.

About The Center for Game Science

The Center for Game Science is part of the Computer Science & Engineering department at the University of Washington. The goal of the Center is to advance the state of the art in games research and to find solutions to currently unsolved problems in science and education by leveraging human creativity and problem solving in a game context. The Center brings together leading computer scientists, learning scientists, educational experts, scientific domain experts, game designers, developers, and artists for the purpose of producing massively multiplayer games that advance scientific discovery and revolutionize educational practices.

The concept of game-based learning is beginning to receive attention in Children´s Education and one of the more interesting innovations in this arena has been developed in Norway by pioneering startup company WeWantToKnow.

Image

WeWantToKnow´s first game, DragonBox, replaces the numbers, letters and signs in Algebra with more child-friendly symbols such as funky dragons, cool animals and other engaging characters.

Using the medium of a fun game, contemporary designed animation and the touchscreen technology of a smartphone or tablet computer, Kids quickly learn how symbols can be moved and combined on both sides of a split screen divide that represents the equal sign in an equation.

Image

By hiding x, y and other algebraic symbols under a layer of animated gameplay, the software is capable of introducing Kids from as young as 8 years of age to the world of Algebra, gradually revealing its underlying mathematical logic to them.

The beauty of DragonBox is that although the Kids are learning Algebra and complex equations they don´t actually realize it.  As far as they are concerned, they are simply having fun working through the different levels of the game as they would do in any other game with each level achieved awarding them one to three stars depending on how quickly they have solved the puzzle.  In fact one could say that DragonBox has put the “fun” into fundamental mathematics.

In tests held at schools in Norway, after only one hour of playing DragonBox, twelve-year olds were solving equations that even their parents would struggle to tackle. Three weeks ago DragonBox was pre-launched in Norway, immediately rocketing to the top of the charts, becoming the most purchased app in the Apple App Store – displacing more traditional games such as the mega-popular Angry Birds. Today more than 10% of all iPad users in Norway have downloaded DragonBox.

Image

DragonBox is available in English, French and Norwegian and is designed for iPad and Android tablets, but also works well on iPhone and Android phones. It can be downloaded from the Apple App Store or Google Play for $2.99 or $5.99 depending on whether you buy DragonBox or a DragonBox + (an extended version of the game).  A PC version will also soon be available.

There are many more games in the pipeline – which is great news for Parents, Teachers and Kids. The company was founded by financial analyst turned math teacher Jean-Baptiste Huyhn and the leading French game developer Patrick Marchal who share a joint vision “to make Learning fun, easy and addictive”.

Image

Jean-Baptiste Huynh; Co-founder and CEO of WeWantToKnow

You can learn more about the company on the web at www.wewanttoknow.com,

www.dragonboxapp.com    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T_kO8-O7yNg&feature=related

Or contact Ian McMonagle, Head of Media Relations at We Want To Know Ianmac@wewanttoknow.com – mobile – 0047 91009703

Image

Has the UK Education Secretary, Mr Gove, got it wrong? Surely Maths lessons don´t need to \”Toughen Up\”, but Smarten Up! | PR Fire

via Has the UK Education Secretary, Mr Gove, got it wrong? Surely Maths lessons don´t need to \”Toughen Up\”, but Smarten Up! | PR Fire.

DragonBox – Algebra Meets Angry Birds.

DragonBox – ‘The first real Algebra game’.